Annual Prater’s Mill Fair Highlights ‘The Collard Patch’


Southern Story Cookbook on Collard Greens — Healthy, Safe Alternative To Spinach/Lettuce

The annual Prater’s Mill Country Fair in Dalton, Georgia, highlights as its featured book ‘The Collard Patch’ by authors Mary Cheatham and Paul Elliott. ‘The Collard Patch,’ the only cookbook worldwide dedicated to collard greens, cornbread, and all the fixin’s, is more than simply a Southern cookbook. It is a deliciously delightful book of recipes, a manual of tips on growing collard greens, and a collection of stories of a youth in the South. Collard greens, an often overlooked, delicious, healthy, safe alternative to the E. coli health scare posed by spinach and now suspected to be associated with lettuce, is found in ‘The Collard Patch,’ a story cookbook from www.collardlovers.com

Dalton, Georgia (PRWEB) October 13, 2006 — Each year at the annual Prater’s Mill Country Fair—www.pratersmill.org—in Dalton, Georgia, fair organizers select a featured book to highlight. This year ‘The Collard Patch’ is their featured book by authors Mary Cheatham and Paul Elliott, who will be signing copies of this First Edition Saturday and Sunday, October 14 and 15.

‘The Collard Patch,’ the only cookbook worldwide dedicated to collard greens, cornbread, and all the fixin’s, is more than simply a Southern cookbook. It is a deliciously delightful book of recipes, a manual of tips on growing collard greens, and a collection of stories of a youth in the South. It is available at www.CollardLovers.com.

Collard greens are a delicious, healthy, safe alternative to the E. coli illness scare posed by spinach and now suspected to be associated with lettuce. The nation has become more health conscious in recent years as consumers enjoy increasing amounts of dark green leafy vegetables. Though our palates are now acclimated to spinach, other excellent alternatives are often neglected. Collard greens are an outstanding example.

Collard greens are grown in many different areas of the nation, as opposed to spinach, half of which is grown in an area of southern California. Collards, on the other hand, are often produced by local farmers all over the South on small farms supplying their area supermarkets.

More and more homeowners are growing their own collards in flowerbeds, patio planters and pots, and small gardens. Now is a perfect time to plant winter collards in many areas of the country. Growing, preparing, and serving techniques along with many original recipes for collard greens and their main accompaniment, cornbread, are found in a delightful story cookbook, ‘The Collard Patch,’ available at www.collardlovers.com.

We often develop prejudices in our youth because vegetables are ill-prepared. For example, collard greens have traditionally been over-cooked and laden with fat. While many love the flavor, others find the over-cooked character and the excess fat unpalatable and unhealthy.
These prejudices often paralyze our willingness to consider that vegetables, such as collard greens, can be not only very healthy but absolutely delicious. If you are not accustomed to eating collards, you will discover you have missed incredibly tasty flavor. There are many delicious ways to flavor them with ingredients other than pork or other types of fat. Many such delightful alternatives as vinegar, orange juice, lemon juice, red pepper, seasoning blends of various types, olive oil, onions, garlic, curry powder, raisins, coconut, orange marmalade, turkey sausage, and even peanut butter work beautifully with collard greens.

Like spinach, collards are excellent sources of fiber, antioxidants, beta carotene, minerals such as calcium, and vitamins A, B, C, and K. Some authorities have even suggested that collard greens are healthier than spinach.

Preparation techniques cooks have learned for spinach are different for collards. These are discussed in the story cookbook, ‘The Collard Patch.’ Also ‘The Collard Patch’ has unforgettable stories that will bless your heart and make you chuckle out loud, as well as the most popular collard greens recipe in the world. It has 288 big pages with 244 remarkable recipes for collards, cornbread, and all the trimmings. There are helpful food facts and nutritional information about the healthiest food.

There are recipes for delightfully flavored wraps, salads, side dishes, entrees, and even desserts. Yes, desserts. If you think you don’t like collards, you haven’t tasted these collards.

‘The Collard Patch’ is also a storybook reader with many delightful stories of a young boy Growing Up In Collard Country. The book also contains experiences and tips for growing your own collard greens even in back porch planters. The book includes information about controlling pests in your crop.

Join Cheatham and Elliott at the Prater’s Mill County Fair October 14 and 15 for their special book signing of this First Edition—kick the spinach habit and develop a collard habit. Get your copy of ‘The Collard Patch’ today at www.collardlovers.com.

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